Polytunnel placement is important


A polytunnel should be placed for catching the sunlight but that must be tempered with protection from the wind. That is a difficult thing to do on my land. I am on the west coast of Ireland and this is first land fall for Atlantic storms.

I awoke this morning to find the tunnel flattened by last night's storm. Winds gusted at 80 mph. The tunnel had already been weakened by previous storms this winter. I knew it was only a matter of time before the storms returned to finish the job.

I shall get a new plastic sheet but probably won't repair the tunnel until it is moved to a hoped for farm later in the year. It looks like I shall be growing peppers inside the house this year.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Could you rig or grow a wind break to protect the polytunnel? It could be built low enough not to cast too much shade but be built to direct the wind over the top of the tunnell.

James said...

As can be seen in the photo the tunnel is surrounded by wind breaks. If the bushes were any closer then there would be too much shade.

The wind breaks were totally ineffectual. All that happens is the wind passes over, creates a partial vacuum which wrenches the tunnel anyway.

An 80 MPH vacuum is as destructive as an 80 MPH wind.